Fresh Water Fill

Fresh Water Fill

Information

Fresh Water Inlet

The freshwater inlet is a lockable deck filler style cap by Sam Allen (I think – It looks the same anyway)

38mm 316G Stainless Steel Water Lockable Filler. 

• 316G stainless steel.
• Cylinder lock made from marine grade stainless steel.
• Designed when locked the cap revolves freely but cannot be opened.
• O-ring seal.
• Cap retainer wire

sam allen marine deck water filler

 

Problems

Can Not Unlock Cap

Locking the cap seems to be a bad idea. The lock allows the caps to spin without unthreading. Several people have had issues with the lock no unthreading once unlocked. In one case the entire cap had to be drilled off. I recommend not locking. If you insist on locking, then make sure the lock mechanism is clean and working smoothly prior to locking.

Those of you keen to ensure the filler cap is always locked – if you get stuck then you can add water vie the breather hoses on top of the water tank. Access via the pump storage bay.

(James Young)

 

 

Tips

Save A Drop – Water Measuring Device

 Filling your tank when the roof is down can take a bit of guesswork. The fresh water level display inside the camper. We found this little device. It sits inline, anywhere between the water faucet and the end of your hose, and measure the amount of water entering the tank. It can display litres or gallons.

Available on Amazon.com HERE for around $20+

 (James Young)

Webasto Dual Top

Webasto Dual Top

Information

The Webasto Dual Top Evo 6 is used for in cabin heating and water heating. This was installed in all models up to circa September 2018.

 

Suggested Dual Top Spares Kit:

  • Part # 9019412B – Burner with glow plug
  • Part #9019415C – Gasket kit

Problems

Water Leak (Gasket)

We had a slow but steady Webasto Dual Top leak (as with all water leaks, listen for the pump cycling when it has not been used). It seems to have been caused by a faulty or poorly installed gasket.

 The images below show the telltale watermarks and also the location of this cover on the dual top.

webasto dual top gasket   webasto dual top gasket   webasto dual top gasket cover   webasto dual top gaskets   webasto dual top port

 

Here’s what we did.

1. Remove hose clamps and hoses from the heater side of the dual top, not the side with water lines.
2. Undo the 8 screws (torx 25) around dark plastic end cap that sits around the whole end of the dual top unit. Slide off (be careful of the electrical attachment connecting the dual top to the end cap, lots of slack though)
3. You should now be able to see the fan and gasket (see one of the photos)
4. Check for water marks (see one of photos) water marks indicate a leak
5. Undo the two bolts holding in the gasket BUT NOT ALL THE WAY. There are four parts to the gasket, a back plate and rubber seal that go inside the dual top, then another rubber seal and front plate that go outside the dual top. The dual top itself is sandwiched between the rubber seals. So do not undo the bolts all the way or the rear backing plate and seal will disappear inside the dual top.
6. With the bolts undone almost all of the way you can wiggle the back plate and seal out.
7. Check for seal issues (see photo). Ours was installed ‘bound up’ so the back runner wasn’t touching at one upper area.
8. Replace seal if necessary.
9. Reverse procedure to re-install.

I am no mechanic, this was an easy diagnosis and should be as easy a fix.

(James Young)

Replacing the Burner

This is a follow-up on our dual top failure. Feel free to read my previous post about the symptoms that led up to it finally not working at all.

Irv Leach contacted me offline to show me a picture of what his burner looked like when he removed it after experiencing the same symptoms. Sure enough, ours looked the same as his (see photos).

With tips from Webasto support as well as Tracy Pospeshil and Michael Fox (Webasto contacts) on FB I was able to order a new burner and gasket set and get them installed. The hardest part was getting the unit out of the camper. The exhaust and water dump hose have to be removed from the bottom via the rear storage compartment, and of course all the heater ducting, water lines, fuel line and control cables need to be disconnected under the seat before unbolting then finally removing the very awkward shaped unit. Be sure to drain the water from the unit per instructions in the manual or it will weigh much more.

Once removed I went about removing the intake end of the unit, taking pictures as I went so I’d know how to put it back together. Make note of how the glow-plug goes into the burner because the new plug (included with the burner) needs to be installed into the new burner. New gaskets MUST be used (the old blue one was brittle and easily broke after I removed it). Also make note of routing and connecting of various wires, connectors and the fuel line. Pictures really help.

Tracy provided these tips:
· Everything goes on/in/together one way so if it doesn’t feel or look right, it might not be.
· Before removing and reinstalling the end cap, put a little cooking oil on the two metal water lines. The grommet that they push through can come dislodged easily.
· When installing the burner, that looooong fuel line will likely get bent. Don’t worry about it, just get it close to the proper shape and you’ll be fine. (see the next point).
· As soon as the combustion air fan and motor are bolted in place, spin the fans by hand and listen for rubbing. There should be no noise. If there is, double-check that the fuel line that is not under the fan is not rubbing on the underside.
· The wiring connectors on the control module are similar to one another. They only go in one hole, and in one orientation.

While you have the dual top out of the camper it’s a good idea to check the water plug on the opposite end of the unit (see photo). A couple owners had water leaks at this plug. Read previous posts to learn more about it. It would be easy to fix while the unit is out. Ours was fine and still had the factory blue paint seal on it.

After reinstalling the unit in the camper, hooking everything up and filling it with water I turned the unit on. It fired up the first try and it’s working great.

I’m going to attempt to clean our old burner up using brake cleaner spray and a soft wire brush to remove the carbon buildup. I’ll keep this as our spare, along with another gasket set.

I had asked for a dealer recommendation while talking to the Webasto hotline. I was given the info below and they did a fine job. Of course you could order the parts from any Webasto dealer. I did learn they don’t all charge the same for the parts.

We purchased thru Thermo King of Pittsburgh PA. Phone is 724-863-1555, then 2 for parts, and 2 again for Tim Simkovic.

Parts needed:
Burner #9019412 (comes with a new glow plug) I think this was $231
Gasket Set P/N 9019415 about $30
Plus taxes and shipping

(Dennis York)

 

dual top inside

Taking things apart to get at the burner.

burner location

That’s the burner in the middle. Wires go to the glowplug. The horizontal tubing is the fuel line (be careful not to bend the new one when installing).

old vs new burner

Old burner and new burner. Glowplug not yet installed on the new burner. Note the carbon buildup on the old unit. DO YOUR MONTHLY MAINTENANCE TO KEEP THIS FROM HAPPENING! 

Tips

Monthly Burn Off 

As per Webasto instructions a monthly ‘burn off’ is recommended to keep the system running smoothly. It is an easy task, see the INSTRUCTION MANUAL for more information.

(James Young)

 

Tank Disinfection

In case no water has been taken from the water supply system for a period of a week or more, drain the whole water system and rinse it thoroughly before refilling it.

See the INSTRUCTION MANUAL (Paragraph 7.1) for more information.

(James Young)

 

Tank Descaling

Depending on the hardness of the water, used for heating in the Dual Top Evo 6, scaling and lime deposits can form in the coolant hoses and the boiler. In order not to restrict the water quality and the heater efficiency, it is advisable to conduct descaling regularly depending on the water quality.

See the INSTRUCTION MANUAL (Paragraph 7.2) for more information.

(James Young)

Johnson Sump Tank

Johnson Sump Tank

Information

The Johnson Multiple Port Shower Sump collects water from the sink, which runs through a plastic filter tube before entering the sump tank. Once the water reaches a certain level the pump (red item in picture below) is triggered by a water level switch (black item in above below).

The sump needs periodic cleaning, depending on how often water is sent into it and how dirty that water is. It is recommended not to drain solid matter into the tank. Many use a bowl in the sink and throw the contents of the bowl away outside the camper. Cleaning the tank and, more importantly, the filter tube should keep things running smoothly.

Johnson Sump Pump

 

Problems

Sump Not Emptying

 

  • Pump Failure
  • Water Level Switch Failure
  • Clogged Exit
  • Grey Tank Full

 

Pump Failure

No noise at all from the pump would indicate a pump failure. Check the break for the pump on the camper breaker panel. Use a multimeter to test the power at the pump. (James Young)

If the pump ‘whirs’ but is not pumping out the water then it may be clogged. Turn off at the breaker and carefully use a small thin item to clear the intake.

(James Young)

 

If the pump ‘whirs’ but is not pumping out the water then it may have an air pocket. This often happens after cleaning, especially if cleaning involved removing all of the water in the sump. It is a bit hit and miss but cleaning around the pump intake (base of the pump) with a cloth usually either moves air or pushes water into the pump. It often takes me a few rounds of cleaning / switching the breaker back on to get the pump to drain the sump tank.

(James Young)

 

The inside of the motor can be cleaned and is sometimes the cause of the pump whirring but not taking up water.  The image below shows the black pump top and also a black tab with the screw in it. This tab is the catch to secure the motor. Pull the tab forward and turn the motor counter-clockwise then up to remove it. Check the impeller on the bottom for gunk.

(Dennis York)

johnson sump pump

Tips

Protect Sump Tank Cover

The sump tank cover can be prone to splitting at the screw holes. It is important not to overtighten the screws. The force can also be spread over a wider area by using a washer. I tighten the screws until the washer is not moveable underneath the screw head. Then back off the screw very slightly.

Ensure the wires leading out of the tank are neatly aligned when replacing the cover. The cover should fit cleanly over the top of these, the wires able to lay flat on the case underneath.

(James Young)

Sump Tank Cleaning

An old toothbrush of a bottle brush are useful for getting around the pump and switch.

(James Young)

 

After cleaning, run water into the sump tank to ensure the pump is working correctly prior to re-installing the cover. The pump often requires a bit of debris removal / air pocket removal after cleaning. Ensure it all works before installing the cover.

(James Young)

 

 

Johnson Macerator Pump

Johnson Macerator Pump

Information

The Johnson TA3P-10 Macerator Pump was originally designed for lavatory waste. I assume the benefit to the grey water tank is that any food particles from the sink, or any hair etc from the shower, get macerated and do not block the pump. 

The pump pulls grey water directly from the grey water tank, through the pump and out of the grey water hose.

Problems

Tank Not Emptying

  • Pump Failure
  • Pump not priming
  • Macerator Blocked
  • Clogged Exit
  • Grey Tank Empty
  • Camper at an angle that prevents remaining grey water from emptying

 

Pump Failure

No noise at all from the pump could indicate a pump failure. Check the break for the pump on the camper breaker panel. Use a multimeter to test the power at the pump.

(James Young)

 

Pump not Priming

I’ve had difficulty getting the macerator pump to prime (pump whirring correctly, but not picking up water) and apparently, others have as well. Solved this problem by putting suction on the pump outlet with a simple transfer pump and switching macerater pump on.

(Joseph Braun)

 

Macerator Blocked

If the pump ‘whirs’ but is not pumping out the water then the macerator may be clogged / stuck. Sometimes this emits a squealing noise.

If that happens, switch off the pump, use a small electrical screwdriver to remove the top cap of the Grey Macerator Tank. This exposes a metal block with a slot for a flat head screwdriver, I assume this is the auger.

Using a flathead screwdriver rotate that metal head to turn the shaft and free the blockage. You can turn clockwise or anti clockwise BUT whatever way you choose finish by turning it a turn anticlockwise. I believe this sets it up in some way but not sure how.

It was easy enough, worked first time when I switched it back on. Instructions are in the XP manual, thankfully Claire thought of looking there.

(James Young)

 

 

Camper Angle

Earlier models have a pump hose attached to the side of the tank. This causes a mixture of air and water when the grey water levels gets too low. Or, worse still, just air of the camper is angled away from the hose. In this instance, placing some blocks under the wheel diagonally opposite where the sump hose is attached will ‘push’ all the water up to that end and allow the pump to empty cleanly.

Later models have the hose inserted in the top of the tank, almost touching the bottom of the tank. This helps reduce the water / air mixture. This fix has been done on some early campers, look for tips elsewhere in this post.

(James Young)

 

Tips

Keep Grey Tank Clear of Debris

Keeping the grey tank clean and clear of larger debris will be beneficial to the grey tank macerator pump. Some use a washing up bowl in the sink, throwing the water away outside the camper. This reduces food particles and such from getting into the sump tank and then the grey tank; meaning obvious benefits to both.

(James Young)

Grey Tank Cleaning

Running a grey tank cleaner through the system will help reduce grey water ‘smells’ especially in hot weather. Regular cleaning helps, regular emptying helps too.

(James Young)

Stay ECO to dump anywhere

Using environmentally friendly soaps, detergent etc and not adding anything toxic to the grey tank means that you can dump it anywhere, within reason. It is worth noting that even ‘environmentally friendly’ soaps like Meyers or Dr Bronners can be bad for lakes, streams, rivers etc. So, if you do ‘wild dump’ do so away from a water source.

(James Young)

Hose Nozzle

Our fresh water drain hose and our grey water pump hose finished with a ball valve only. This meant the water sprayed out of the end, rather than coming out in a nice stream.  A bit messy with the grey and the fresh water was awkward to get into small holes, like adding some to the toilet for example. We added a connecting screw thread, usually used for connecting two threaded plumbing items. It makes a nozzle and therefore a nice steady stream of water.

Another option is to add a hose connector to the end. You get a steady stream, plus an option to add an additional hose should you need to. 

water hose nozzle

(James Young + Gerhard Faessler)